Company foundation

April 12, 1883

The origins of ELECTRIC date back to 1883. It was at this time that Mr. Béringer organized the distribution of devices for converting gas lighting installations into electrical installations.

Company development

14 Mai 1898

His successor, Césaire De Vos, developed the company. His strategy was simple: visit foreign companies to find products that could be marketed in Belgium. Philips importer at the beginning of the 20th century, the company gradually reduced the import of electrical equipment to focus on the distribution of Belgian products which were beginning to emerge, catalog in support.

Creation of S.C ELECTRIC

1923

In 1923, S.C. ELECTRIC was created, resulting from the merger of 5 stores.
The company's strategy was to develop its points of sale near stations in order to facilitate the receipt of goods.

ELECTRIC S.A

1928

In 1928, Electric became a public limited company and inaugurated a manufacturing plant for gears and mechanical parts for industry and the automobile. It also imports for the first time in Belgium Klöckner Moeller equipment (Germany) and Century electric motors (United States).

ELECTRIC NIVELLES

2022

From restructuring to developments over the decades, from economic evolution and the electricity market, Electric has constantly evolved to now have 10 points of sale in Belgium.
In 2022, Electric opens its new head office in Nivelles.

LICHTPUNT & ERM BY ELECTRIC

2022

Acquisition of two points of sale in Merelbeke, Lichtpunt and ERM by Electric

L'éveil de l'électricité

Dans la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle, l'électricité suscite de nombreux espoirs, illusions et craintes. Parmi les inventions les plus emblématiques de cette époque, la lampe électrique répond au désir d'une lumière facilement accessible, simple à utiliser et sécurisée.

L'invention de la lampe à incandescence par Thomas Edison

1879

En 1879, Thomas Edison crée la première lampe à incandescence dotée d'un filament en bambou sous vide, capable de fonctionner pendant environ trente heures. Edison ne s'arrête pas là et fonde plusieurs sociétés industrielles spécialisées dans la fabrication de lampes, moteurs électriques et réseaux urbains. Il déposera plus d'un millier de brevets tout au long de sa carrière.

L'éveil de l'électricité

Dans la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle, l'électricité suscite de nombreux espoirs, illusions et craintes. Parmi les inventions les plus emblématiques de cette époque, la lampe électrique répond au désir d'une lumière facilement accessible, simple à utiliser et sécurisée.

L'éveil de l'électricité

Dans la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle, l'électricité suscite de nombreux espoirs, illusions et craintes. Parmi les inventions les plus emblématiques de cette époque, la lampe électrique répond au désir d'une lumière facilement accessible, simple à utiliser et sécurisée.

Le premier tramway électrique

1885

En 1885, le premier tramway électrique est mis en service à Sarajevo, en Bosnie-Herzégovine. Cette avancée technologique marque une étape importante dans l'évolution des transports urbains.

Le premier transformateur de Lucien Gaulard

1884

En 1884, Lucien Gaulard présente le premier transformateur permettant d’élever la tension délivrée par un alternateur, ce qui facilite le transport de l’énergie électrique par des lignes haute tension. La même année, Nikola Tesla met au point le premier moteur à induction utilisant le courant alternatif.

THE CONTRACT BETWEEN PHILIPS AND ELECTRIC

1911

In 1911, a major contract was signed between Philips and Electric (Béringer & De Vos). The firm Béringer & De Vos committed to purchasing 65,000 metallic incandescent lamps from Philips S.A. by the end of 1912. It was also the year of the release of the first 'Electric' catalogs.

THE BRUSSELS WORLD'S FAIR

1910

In 1910, the Brussels World's Fair was held at Solbosch. This exposition was a significant event for the company.

THE COLLABORATION WITH WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC COMPANY

1909

In 1909, the Westinghouse Electric Company authorized Messrs. Béringer & De Vos, their agents in Belgium and Holland, to receive all registered shipments addressed to the Westinghouse Electric Company Limited, 18 Comédiens Street in Brussels. This recognition marked a turning point in the international expansion of the Electric company.

THE HISTORY OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

1908

In 1908, Césaire De Vos signed the lease for the store located on Comédiens Street in Brussels. In the same year, Dutch physicist Kamerlingh Onnes discovered the process of helium liquefaction, thus opening the history of superconductivity.

THE PARTNERSHIP 'BÉRINGER AND DE VOS'

1907

In 1907, Electric became a partnership under the name 'Béringer and De Vos'. Césaire De Vos managed the company alone and was responsible for the corporate signature.

THE FIRST TRUE RADIO BROADCAST

1906

In 1906, the first true radio broadcast was aired in the United States. It was also the year the first electric vacuum cleaner was invented.

ALBERT EINSTEIN'S THEORY OF RELATIVITY

1882

In 1905, Albert Einstein developed the theory of relativity and established the relationship between mass and energy, formulated by the famous equation E = mc².

THE ARDENNES CIRCUIT

1904

In 1904, Electric sponsored the Ardennes Circuit, the ancestor of the Belgian Grand Prix. Between 1902 and 1907, the Ardennes Circuit was won three times by Belgians.

THE FIRST TWO-RATE ELECTRICITY METER

1903

In 1903, the company Landis and Gyr manufactured the first two-rate electricity meter. In the same year, Henry Ford built his first car, although he only started selling them in 1903.

THE INVENTION OF THE TELEGRAPHONE

In 1902, Valdemar Poulsen invented the telegraphone, the ancestor of the tape recorder.

The first transatlantic wireless radio signals

1901

In 1901, Guglielmo Marconi sent the first transatlantic wireless radio signals from Poldhu (Cornwall) to Saint-Thomas (Newfoundland).

The synchronization of the gramophone and the cinema projector

1900

At the turn of the century, Peugeot was already a leading manufacturer. Its catalog included 15 models ranging from 2 to 12 seats, and it advertised in local newspapers. In 1900, Léon Gaumont solved the synchronization problem between the gramophone and the cinema projector, allowing for the emergence of talking movies.

The first cross-Channel radio link

1899

In 1899, the first cross-Channel radio link was established, paving the way for a new era of wireless communication. At the beginning of the 20th century, electric energy had become major. It illuminated parties, exhibitions, and interiors. It was ready to conquer the world. Even though it continued to face formidable competitors, it looked to the future with confidence, as it seemed limitless.

Electric company development

May 14, 1898

His successor, Césaire De Vos, expanded the company. His strategy was simple: visit foreign companies to find products that could be marketed in Belgium. As a Philips importer at the beginning of the 20th century, the company gradually reduced the import of electrical equipment to focus on the distribution of Belgian products that were beginning to emerge, supported by catalogs. In 1898, the first radio factory opened in Chelmsford, England. This marked the beginning of wireless telegraphy, which was extensively illustrated in Electric's catalogs of the time.

The invention of the cathode ray tube

1897

In 1897, Ferdinand Braun invented the cathode ray tube, an essential discovery for the future development of television.

The first modern Olympic Games

1896

In 1896, the first modern Olympic Games brought together 13 countries in Athens. That year, electric companies began installing the first single-rate meters at their customers' premises.

The discovery of X-rays by Wilhelm Röntgen

1895

In 1895, German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen discovered mysterious rays he called X-rays. He produced the first radiograph, generating great interest among physicians. Electric then began marketing X-ray tubes. It was also this year that Thomas Edison created the first fluorescent lamp from an X-ray tube.

Art Nouveau conquers Europe

1894

In 1894, the Art Nouveau style began to conquer European cities. This artistic movement would later influence the cover pages of Electric's catalogs. Césaire De Vos, at the age of 14, started selling lampshades for electric lighting.

The congress of electricians in Chicago

1893

In 1893, during the congress of electricians in Chicago, the measurement units approved at the congresses of 1881 and 1889 were confirmed and clarified. It is also the year of the emergence of the first household appliances such as the iron, the electric kettle, the electric oven, and the electric heater, demonstrating the progress of the industry.

The transformation of the Edison General Electric Company

1892

In 1892, the Edison General Electric became simply General Electric, a company that would play a crucial role in the history of electricity.

The creation of the Philips company

1891

In 1891, brothers Gérard and Anton Philips founded the Philips company in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, to manufacture electric lamps. The beginnings were difficult, but in April 1892, they received their first order from a cheese factory in Gouda. In their second year, Philips produced 11,000 lamps, and Electric became the official importer of Philips lamps in Belgium.

The electric metro locomotive

1890

In 1890, the first electric metro locomotive entered service in London, ushering in a new era for public transportation in major cities.

The Eiffel Tower and the Edison General Electric Company

1889

In 1889, the construction of the tower designed by Gustave Eiffel for the Universal Exhibition was completed, making it the tallest structure in the world at 324 meters. The Edison Electric Light Company became the Edison General Electric Company. At the International Congress of Electricians in Paris, the joule and watt were confirmed as units of energy and power, and the kilowatt was chosen as the unit for measuring the power of electric motors.

The collaboration with Nikola Tesla

1888

In 1888, Nikola Tesla, employed by Thomas Edison, designed the first operational system for the generation and transmission of alternating current for electricity networks. However, Edison was a staunch advocate of direct current. Therefore, Tesla resigned and sold the rights to his inventions to Georges Westinghouse, with whom Electric would later collaborate.

The invention of the dry cell by W. Hellesen

1887

In 1887, W. Hellesen succeeded in constructing the world's first effective dry cell, a new energy source that immediately gained success. Electric quickly manufactured its own version of the dry cell.

The foundation of Westinghouse Electric Corporation

1886

Georges Westinghouse, an American inventor and industrialist, founded the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in 1886. The following year, he established the first alternating current network for lighting in Buffalo.

The first electric tram

1885

In 1885, the first electric tram was put into service in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. This technological advancement marked an important milestone in the evolution of urban transport.

Lucien Gaulard's first transformer

1884

In 1884, Lucien Gaulard presented the first transformer that allowed the voltage delivered by an alternator to be increased, facilitating the transport of electrical energy via high-voltage lines. In the same year, Nikola Tesla developed the first induction motor using alternating current.

Foundation of Electric

1883

The origins of ELECTRIC date back to 1883. It was during this time that Mr. Béringer organized the distribution of devices for converting gas lighting installations into electrical installations.

The first electric factories

1882

In 1882, Lewis Howard Latimer obtained a patent for his process of manufacturing carbon filaments. In the same year, the Edison Electric Light Company inaugurated the first electric factories producing direct current in London and New York, marking the beginning of large-scale electricity distribution.

The first International Electricity Exhibition

1881

In 1881, Paris hosted the first International Electricity Exhibition. Visitors discovered revolutionary innovations such as Zénobe Gramme's dynamo, Thomas Edison's light bulbs, Werner von Siemens' electric tram, and Alexander Graham Bell's telephone. It was also during this exhibition that the units of electrical measurement, such as the ohm, volt, ampere, coulomb, and farad, were established by the International Congress of Electricians.

The invention of the incandescent lamp by Thomas Edison

1879

In 1879, Thomas Edison created the first incandescent lamp with a bamboo filament in a vacuum, capable of operating for about thirty hours. Edison didn't stop there and founded several industrial companies specializing in the manufacture of lamps, electric motors, and urban networks. Throughout his career, he filed more than a thousand patents.

The awakening of electricity

In the second half of the 19th century, electricity sparked many hopes, illusions, and fears. Among the most iconic inventions of that time, the electric lamp met the desire for easily accessible, simple to use, and safe lighting.